Slough’s attack on sugar

Published: 25 January 2018

Slough Borough Council’s public health team is working with the Change4Life public health campaign to raise awareness of good dental health, following the release of statistics about tooth decay in under fives by Public Health England.

The council’s oral health improvement project has been running since March last year to help improve dental health in the borough, particularly among children.

The project aims to reduce the number of children who have decayed, missing or filled teeth, by improving the promotion of good oral health, encouraging people to make better diet choices, reducing sugary food and drinks and improving dental hygiene.

To spread the word, the team has been holding information sessions across children’s centres, nurseries and primary schools in the borough to engage with families who have children under five years old.

So far more than 160 hours of information sessions have been held, with 4,000 ‘top tips for terrific teeth’ leaflets distributed. All 10 children’s centres have also now reached gold accreditation, for reaching high standards in oral health advice and promotion.

In addition, the council’s public health team is working closely with dentist practices and the Thames Valley public health England team through the starting well programme, which launches later this week.

Cllr Natasa Pantelic, cabinet member for health and social care, said: “We have been investing in the oral health improvement project as just one of the initiatives to try and tackle this problem and have had a fantastic response from all of the nurseries, schools and children’s centres who have taken part in the training.

“I hope it will go some way to improve oral health in young children and their families.

“It's never too late to make changes to your diet and habits, no matter how old you are but the sooner you start the better. I would encourage everyone to eat more healthily, be more active and brush your teeth at least twice a day!

“We are working very closely with dentists and Public Health England to continue getting these messages out.”